Scientific publishing

FILE - This April 14, 2019 file photo shows a western meadowlark in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge in Commerce City, Colo. According to a study released on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019, North America’s skies are lonelier and quieter as nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds soar in the air than in 1970. Some of the most common and recognizable birds are taking the biggest hits, even though they are not near disappearing yet. The population of eastern meadowlarks has shriveled by more than three-quarters with the western meadowlark nearly as hard hit. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
September 19, 2019 - 2:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion...
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FILE - This May 20, 2019 file photo shows marijuana plants in a grow room using green lights during their night cycle in Gardena, Calif. According to research released on Wednesday, June 12, 2019, archaeologists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of people smoking marijuana from a 2,500-year-old graveyard in western China. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
June 12, 2019 - 2:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Archaeologists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of people smoking marijuana from a 2,500-year-old graveyard in western China. In a complex of lofty tombs in the Pamir Mountains — a region near the borders of modern China, Pakistan and Tajikistan — excavators found 10...
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This combination of images provided by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig shows two views of a virtual reconstruction of the Xiahe mandible. At right, the simulated parts are in gray. According to a report released on Wednesday, May 1, 2019, the bone is at least 160,000 years old, and recovered proteins led scientists to conclude the jaw came from a Denisovan, a relative of Neanderthals. (Jean-Jacques Hublin, MPI-EVA, Leipzig)
May 01, 2019 - 1:10 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly 40 years after it was found by a monk in a Chinese cave, a fossilized chunk of jawbone has been revealed as coming from a mysterious relative of the Neanderthals. Until now, the only known remains of these Denisovans were a few scraps of bone and teeth recovered in a Siberian...
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This combination of images provided by the Yale School of Medicine in April 2019 shows stained microscope photos of neurons, green; astrocytes, red, and cell nuclei, blue, from a pig brain left untreated for 10 hours after death, left, and another with a specially designed blood substitute pumped through it. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. (Stefano G. Daniele, Zvonimir Vrselja/Sestan Laboratory/Yale School of Medicine)
April 17, 2019 - 1:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards "this is...
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This undated photo provided by the Oregon Health and Science University in March 2019 shows a baby monkey named Grady, at two weeks old, born from an experimental technology that aims to help young boys undergoing cancer treatment preserve their future fertility. Scientists froze testicular tissue from a monkey that had not yet reached puberty, and later thawed it to produce sperm used for Grady’s conception. (OHSU via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 2:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are closing in on a way to help young boys undergoing cancer treatment preserve their future fertility — and the proof is the first monkey born from the experimental technology. More and more people are surviving childhood cancer, but nearly 1 in 3 will be left...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, a researcher installs a fine glass pipette into a microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization is calling for the U.N. health agency to create a global registry of scientists working on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
March 19, 2019 - 2:52 pm
GENEVA (AP) — A panel convened by the World Health Organization said it would be "irresponsible" for scientists to use gene editing for reproductive purposes, but stopped short of calling for a ban. The experts also called for the U.N. health agency to create a database of scientists working on...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 6:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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This annotated image made available by researcher Mark R. Showalter in February 2019 shows the planet Neptune and its moons, captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2004. The recently discovered moon, Hippocamp, is indicated by a red box and an enlarged version is inset at upper right. (Mark R. Showalter via AP)
February 20, 2019 - 1:15 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Neptune's newest and tiniest moon is probably an ancient fragment of a much larger moon orbiting unusually close. In the journal Nature on Wednesday, California astronomers shine a light on the 21-mile-wide (34-kilometer-wide) moon Hippocamp, named after the mythological...
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This undated image provided by Chinese Academy of Sciences shows the Artist's impression of the Milky Way. Scientists in China and Australia released an updated 3D map of the Milky Way on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. They used 1,339 pulsating stars, young, newly catalogued stars bigger and brighter than our sun, to map the galaxy’s shape. (Xiaodian Chen/Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
February 05, 2019 - 2:16 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — It turns out our Milky Way galaxy is truly warped, at least around the far edges. Scientists in China and Australia released an updated 3D map of the Milky Way on Tuesday. They used 1,339 pulsating stars — young, newly catalogued stars bigger and brighter than our sun —...
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Senior Hazel Ostrowski attends her first period AP statistics class at Franklin High School Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, in Seattle. High school students are getting more sleep in Seattle, according to a study on later school start times. Ostrowski was among a group at Franklin and another Seattle high school who wore activity monitors to discover whether a later start to the school day would help them get more sleep. It did, adding 34 minutes of slumber a night, and they reported less daytime sleepiness and grades improved. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
December 12, 2018 - 2:47 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — High school students are getting more sleep in Seattle, say scientists studying later school start times. Teenagers wore activity monitors to find out whether a later start to the school day would help them get more sleep. It did, adding 34 minutes of slumber a night. They also...
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