Radioactive contamination

A group of supporters of the trial shows banners reading "unjust sentence" in front of Tokyo District Court in Tokyo Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. The court on Thursday ruled that three former executives for Tokyo Electric Power Company were not guilty of professional negligence in the 2011 Fukushima meltdown. It was the only criminal trial in the nuclear disaster that has kept tens of thousands of residents away from their homes because of lingering radiation contamination. (Satoru Yonemaru/Kyodo News via AP)
September 19, 2019 - 10:10 am
TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese court ruled Thursday that three former executives of Tokyo Electric Power Company were not guilty of professional negligence in the 2011 disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant because ensuring absolute safety at nuclear plants was not a government requirement at that...
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FILE - In this May 21, 1956, file photo, the fireball of a hydrogen bomb lights the Pacific sky a few seconds after the bomb was released over Bikini Atoll. A Texas-based company is facing criticism for naming a beer after the location of nuclear tests that resulted in the contamination of a Pacific island chain, a report said. Manhattan Project Beer Company is under scrutiny by Marshall Islanders who were exposed to high levels of radiation by U.S. government research from 1946 to 1958, The Pacific Daily News reported Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. (AP Photo, File)
August 17, 2019 - 12:27 am
HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — A Texas-based company is facing criticism for naming a beer after the location of nuclear tests that resulted in the contamination of a Pacific island chain, a report said. Manhattan Project Beer Company is under scrutiny by Marshall Islanders who were exposed to high levels of...
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FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2018, file photo, an installation of a dome-shaped rooftop cover housing key equipment is near completion at Unit 3 reactor of the Fukushima Dai-ich nuclear power plant ahead of a fuel removal from its storage pool in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeast Japan. Japan has partially lifted an evacuation order in one of the two hometowns of the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant for the first time since the 2011 disaster. The action taken Wednesday, April 10, 2019, allows people to return about 40 percent of Okuma. The other hometown, Futaba, remains off-limits as are several other towns nearby.(AP Photo/Mari Yamaguchi, File)
April 09, 2019 - 11:25 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japan partially lifted an evacuation order in one of the two hometowns of the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant on Wednesday for the first time since the 2011 disaster. Decontamination efforts have lowered radiation levels significantly in the area about 7 kilometers (4 miles)...
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FILE - The first load of nuclear waste arrives in this March 26, 1999 file photo, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in Carlsbad, N.M., from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Twenty years and more than 12,380 shipments later, tons of Cold War-era waste from decades of bomb-making and nuclear research across the U.S. have been stashed in the salt caverns that make up the underground facility. (AP Photo/Thomas Herbert)
March 23, 2019 - 6:53 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It wasn't long after the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan and World War II ended that the United States began to realize it had to do something with the waste that was being generated by defense-related nuclear research and bomb-making that would continue through the Cold...
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FILE - In this April 8, 1998, file photo, a worker drives a cart through a tunnel inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No. 2, 150 feet below the surface near Carlsbad, N.M. Twenty years and more than 12,330 shipments later, tons of Cold War-era radioactive waste from decades of bomb-making and research have been stashed in the salt caverns that make up the underground facility and not without issues. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)
March 23, 2019 - 6:51 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — In a remote stretch of New Mexico desert, the U.S. government put in motion an experiment aimed at proving to the world that radioactive waste could be safely disposed of deep underground, rendering it less of a threat to the environment. Twenty years and more than 12,380...
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Stephen Parlato wears a gas mask next to his sign warning about the dangers of plutonium at Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge outside Denver on Saturday, Sept. 15, 2018, the first day the refuge was open to the public. The refuge is on the outskirts of a former U.S. government factory that manufactured plutonium triggers for nuclear weapons. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott)
September 15, 2018 - 3:53 pm
DENVER (AP) — Cyclists and hikers explored a newly opened wildlife refuge at the site of a former nuclear weapons plant in Colorado on Saturday, while a protester in a gas mask brought signs warning about the dangers of plutonium. With no fanfare, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service opened the gates...
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August 17, 2018 - 11:29 am
HOPKINS, S.C. (AP) — Federal regulators say Westinghouse Electric Co. has no plans to clean a plume of uranium under its nuclear fuel factory despite evidence it could reach South Carolina's water supply. Instead, Westinghouse wants a new 40-year extension from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission,...
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A burnt car sits on the outskirts of the village of Monchique in southern Portugal's Algarve region, Monday, Aug. 6, 2018. Emergency services in Portugal say they are still fighting a major wildfire on the south coast that threatened to engulf a hillside town overnight. (AP Photo/Javier Fergo)
August 06, 2018 - 11:51 am
LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Firefighters in Portugal were close to bringing a major, four-day wildfire near a popular tourist area under control Monday as sweltering weather gripped much of Europe. The Portuguese Civil Protection Agency said firefighters had contained 95 percent of the blaze in rolling...
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File - This June 13, 2017 file photo shows two decommissioned plutonium-producing reactors on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation near Richland, Wash. The land where the federal government created some of the plutonium for nuclear weapons will be so cleaned of radiation and other pollution that it could be used for homes in the future. The plan announced Monday, July 30, 2018, would spend $200 million to clean up 7.8 square miles in a portion of Hanford called the 100 Area D and H areas. (AP Photo/Nicholas K. Geranios, File)
July 31, 2018 - 5:23 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — A portion of the vast Washington state site where the U.S. government created much of the plutonium for the nation's nuclear arsenal will be scrubbed free of radiation and other pollution under a final plan reached by the U.S. Department of Energy and federal and state...
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