Lawsuits

FILE - In this July 8, 2019 file photo, Attorney General William Barr speaks during a tour of a federal prison in Edgefield, S.C. The Kennedy Center is unveiling a massive new expansion designed to redefine the iconic performing arts complex and transform the relationships between audience and artist. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
September 06, 2019 - 5:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is wrestling with whether to disclose a name sought by the plaintiffs in a long-running lawsuit that seeks to link the government of Saudi Arabia to the 9/11 attacks. Attorney General William Barr faced a Friday deadline for deciding whether to release the...
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Photographs of loved ones lost in the fire on the scuba boat Conception are placed at a memorial on the Santa Barbara Harbor on Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, in Santa Barbara, Calif. A fire raged through the boat carrying recreational scuba divers anchored near an island off the Southern California Coast on Monday, leaving multiple people dead. (AP Photo/Christian Monterrosa )
September 05, 2019 - 7:18 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The owners of the dive boat where 34 people perished in a fire off Southern California filed a lawsuit Thursday to head off potentially costly litigation. Truth Aquatics Inc., which owned the Conception, filed the action in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles under a pre-Civil War...
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FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2019, file photo former Waymo employee Anthony Levandowski, center, leaves a federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif. A federal judge on Wednesday, Sept. 4, rejected a government recommendation that he impose a $10 million bail bond on Levandowski, a former Google engineer. Levandowski is accused of stealing self-driving car technology before joining Uber's effort to build robotic taxis for its ride-hailing service. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
September 04, 2019 - 5:08 pm
SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — A federal judge has rejected a government recommendation that he impose a $10 million bail bond on a former Google engineer who is accused of stealing self-driving car technology before joining Uber's effort to build robotic taxis. The preliminary ruling issued Wednesday by...
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FILE - In this March 26, 2019, file photo, actor Jussie Smollett smiles and waves to supporters before leaving Cook County Court after his charges were dropped in Chicago. Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion this week arguing that the actor should not have to pay the city of Chicago $130,000 for the police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack in January, because he had no way of knowing how much time and money the department would spend on the probe. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
September 04, 2019 - 12:39 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Jussie Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion arguing that the actor should not have to pay Chicago $130,000 for a police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack, because he couldn't have known how much time and money the department would spend looking...
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September 01, 2019 - 8:48 am
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Upcoming trials seen as test cases for forcing drugmakers to pay for societal damage inflicted by the opioid epidemic should be delayed until Ohio's own lawsuits against the drugmakers can be heard, Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost argued in a lawsuit. Yost, a Republican, said...
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Angela Martínez holds her son Uriel as they walk in a park in Granada, south of Spain, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2019. Uriel's body is covered in hair due to taking a hair-growing medicine containing minoxidil, wrongly labeled as omeprazole. Parents of babies in Spain developing unusual levels of body hair say they are readying a joint lawsuit against the pharmaceutical company that mislabeled an anti-hair-loss drug as a stomach stabilizer. (AP Photo/Sergio Ruiz)
August 31, 2019 - 3:55 pm
GRANADA, Spain (AP) — Parents in Spain whose babies and toddlers developed abnormal body hair plan to sue a company that put a hair loss treatment into containers meant for a medicine, a mother of one of the children said Saturday. Spanish health authorities have blamed the packaging mix-up...
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FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 17, 2018, file photo, Christine Gagnon of Southington, Conn., protests with other family and friends who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses at Purdue Pharma LLP headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma is expected to file for bankruptcy after settlement talks over the nation’s deadly overdose crisis hit an impasse, attorneys general involved in the talks said Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019, in a message to their counterparts across the country. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
August 30, 2019 - 10:50 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — An offer from OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma and the Sackler family to settle some 2,000 lawsuits over their contribution to the national opioid crisis is receiving growing pushback from state and local officials who say the proposed deal doesn't include enough money or...
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August 30, 2019 - 9:19 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The Sackler family siphoned $11 billion from Purdue Pharma L.P., the Oxycontin maker the family owns and which is facing numerous lawsuits, in an attempt to evade "catastrophic liability," Oregon's attorney general said Friday. That amount is higher than some of the numbers other...
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August 30, 2019 - 7:24 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A U.S. appeals court says travelers can sue the government over mistreatment by federal airport screeners because the agents can act like law enforcement officers, including when they conduct invasive searches. The 9-4 decision Friday by the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals...
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FILE - In this June 18, 2015, file photo, Charleston, S.C., shooting suspect Dylann Storm Roof is escorted from the Cleveland County Courthouse in Shelby, N.C. A federal appeals court has reinstated a lawsuit over a faulty background check that allowed Roof to buy the gun he used to kill nine people in a racist attack at a South Carolina church. A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, reversed a lower court judge who threw out the lawsuit brought by survivors and relatives of people killed in the 2015 massacre at Charleston's AME Emanuel Church. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
August 30, 2019 - 6:25 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A lawsuit over a faulty background check that allowed a South Carolina man to buy the gun he used to kill nine people in a racist attack at a Charleston church was reinstated Friday by a federal appeals court. A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals...
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