Industry regulation

FILE - This Friday, March 22, 2019, file photo shows the Department of Justice Building in Washington. The U.S. Department of Justice is opening a sweeping antitrust investigation of major technology companies and whether their online platforms have hurt competition, suppressed innovation or otherwise harmed consumers. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
July 23, 2019 - 9:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Department of Justice opened a sweeping antitrust investigation of major technology companies and whether their online platforms have hurt competition, suppressed innovation or otherwise harmed consumers. It said the probe will take into account "widespread concerns"...
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In this June 15, 2018 photo, pharmaceuticals are seen in North Andover, Mass. Two senior senators — a Republican and a Democrat — unveiled compromise legislation Tuesday to reduce prescription drug costs for millions of Medicare recipients, while saving money for federal and state health care programs that serve seniors and low-income people. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
July 23, 2019 - 7:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Two veteran senators — a Republican and a Democrat — unveiled compromise legislation Tuesday to reduce prescription drug costs for millions of Medicare recipients, while saving money for federal and state health care programs serving seniors and low-income people. Iowa Republican...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2018, file photo Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg takes his seat to testify before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Washington Post reported on Tuesday, July 23, 2019, that the Federal Trade Commission will allege that Facebook misled users about its privacy practices as part of an expected settlement.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
July 23, 2019 - 6:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on U.S. regulation of technology companies (all times local): 6:15 p.m. A longtime digital advertising executive and antitrust expert says American consumers and news publishers need competitive tech markets. Dina Srinivasan spoke Tuesday after the Department of Justice...
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FILE - In this Feb. 27, 2019 file photo, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue testifies during a House Agriculture Committee hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration is proposing to tighten automatic eligibility requirements for the food stamp program. The Agriculture Department says the change could affect about 3.1 million people. The agency says the rule would close “a loophole” that enables people receiving only minimal benefits from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program to be eligible automatically for food stamps.(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
July 23, 2019 - 3:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — About 3.1 million people would lose food stamp benefits under the Trump administration's proposal to tighten automatic eligibility requirements for the food stamp program. The Agriculture Department said Tuesday that the rule would close "a loophole" that enables people receiving...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, July 22, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
July 22, 2019 - 8:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump met with executives from several of the nation's leading chip and computer part makers Monday and discussed restrictions his administration has imposed on the sale of components to Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, the White House said. Huawei is...
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FILE - In this July 6, 2019, file photo, motorcyclists participate in a ride in Randolph, N.H., to remember seven bikers killed there in a collision with a pickup truck in June. State transportation officials in Massachusetts are expected to be questioned during a legislative oversight hearing on Monday, July 22, 2019, in Boston, about the Registry of Motor Vehicles' failure to suspend the commercial license of the truck driver charged in the crash that killed the seven motorcyclists in New Hampshire. (Paul Hayes/Caledonian-Record via AP, File)
July 22, 2019 - 3:24 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts lawmakers opened and then abruptly suspended their inquiry Monday into troubles at the state motor vehicle department that were exposed by a crash that killed seven motorcyclists. The Legislature's Joint Committee on Transportation voted to recess just minutes into its...
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July 22, 2019 - 11:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is penalizing a Chinese company and its top executive for violating U.S. restrictions on dealing with Iran. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says the U.S. is imposing sanctions on Zhuhai Zhenrong (ZHOO-hi ZHEN-wrong) Limited and its chief executive for...
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An employee holds a portrait photo of the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Yukiya Amano from Japan in Vienna, Austria, Monday, July 22, 2019. The IAEA announced the death of the agency's Director General Yukiya Amano at the age of 72 years. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
July 22, 2019 - 11:25 am
VIENNA (AP) — The Latest on reaction to the death of Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (all times local): 5:15 p.m. President Donald Trump's national security adviser says the death of U.N. atomic agency chief Yukiya Amano is a great loss for Japan, the United States...
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FILE - In this Nov. 22, 2018, file photo, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Yukiya Amano of Japan addresses the media during a news conference after a meeting of the IAEA board of governors at the International Center in Vienna, Austria. The IAEA said Monday, July 22, 2019, it is announcing with regret the death of Amano. The Secretariat did not say how Amano, who was 72, died. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)
July 22, 2019 - 4:11 am
VIENNA (AP) — Yukiya Amano, the International Atomic Energy Agency's director general, has died at 72, the agency announced Monday. Amano, a former Japanese diplomat, had extensive experience in disarmament and non-proliferation diplomacy, as well as nuclear energy issues, and had been chief of the...
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In this Wednesday, June 26, 2019 photo, children play on the main road of Stebbins, a Bering Strait village that is home to 646 people, in Alaska. The city is among over a dozen cities in Alaska that have employed police officers whose criminal records should have prevented them from being hired under state law, the Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica reported Saturday, July 20. (Bill Roth/Anchorage Daily News via AP)
July 21, 2019 - 11:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — At least 14 cities in Alaska have employed police officers whose criminal records should have prevented them from being hired under state law, the Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica reported Saturday. The news organizations said they found more than 34 officers who should...
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