immigration

September 07, 2019 - 3:36 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump administration officials will meet next week to discuss whether to further restrict the number of refugees accepted into the U.S. each year, according to a senior administration official. Some administration officials believe that the cap should be reduced because of the...
Read More
In this Aug. 30, 2019, photo, migrants, many who were returned to Mexico under the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico,” program wait in line to get a meal in an encampment near the Gateway International Bridge in Matamoros. Many shelters at the Mexico border are at or above capacity already, and some families have been sleeping in tents or on blankets in the blistering summer heat. (AP Photo/Veronica G. Cardenas)
September 06, 2019 - 2:50 pm
MATAMOROS, Mexico (AP) — Eight-and-a-half-months pregnant and experiencing contractions, a Salvadoran woman who had crossed the Rio Grande and was apprehended by the Border Patrol was forced to go back to Mexico. Agents took her to the hospital, where doctors gave her medication to stop the...
Read More
A tear rolls on the cheek of American national Jennifer Erin Talbot from Ohio before the start of a press conference by the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) in Manila, Philippines, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. The NBI said that the 43-year-old Talbot was arrested at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport yesterday for trying to bring out of the country a 6-day old Filipino baby without proper travel documents. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
September 05, 2019 - 8:39 pm
MANILA, Philippines (AP) — An American woman who attempted to carry a 6-day-old baby out of the Philippines hidden inside a sling bag has been arrested at Manila's airport and charged with human trafficking, officials said Thursday. The Philippine officials said Jennifer Erin Talbot was able to...
Read More
A bullet hole can be seen in the front window of a box truck where law enforcement officers where investigate after shots were fired involving Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in the parking lot of a Food Lion store, Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019, in the Antioch neighborhood of Nashville, Tenn. An ICE agent opened fire in the grocery store parking lot early Thursday during an attempted apprehension, ICE spokesman Bryan Cox said. (Shelley Mays/The Tennessean via AP)
September 05, 2019 - 5:54 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent opened fire in a grocery store parking lot in Tennessee early Thursday during an attempted apprehension, ICE spokesman Bryan Cox said. Cox said the shooting came after agents pulled over an individual who had been under...
Read More
FILE - In this March 11, 2019 photo, construction crews replace a section of the primary wall separating San Diego, above right, and Tijuana, Mexico, below left, seen from Tijuana, Mexico. Defense Secretary Mark Esper has approved the use of $3.6 billion in funding from military construction projects to build 175 miles of President Donald Trump’s wall along the Mexican border. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
September 05, 2019 - 7:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon will cut funding from military projects like schools, target ranges and maintenance facilities to pay for the construction of 175 miles of fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border, diverting a total $3.6 billion to President Donald Trump's long-promised barrier. Projects...
Read More
FILE - In this June 20, 2018 photo, immigrant children walk in a line outside the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children a former Job Corps site that now houses them in Homestead, Fla. Migrant children who were separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border last year suffered post-traumatic stress and other serious mental health problems, according to a government watchdog report obtained by The Associated Press Wednesday. The chaotic reunification process only added to their trauma. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)
September 04, 2019 - 10:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Separated from his father at the U.S.-Mexico border last year, the little boy, about 7 or 8, was under the delusion that his dad had been killed. And he thought he was next. Other children believed their parents had abandoned them. And some suffered physical symptoms because of...
Read More
FILE- This June 20, 2014 file photo shows the Southwest Key-Nueva Esperanza, in Brownsville, Texas, a facility that shelters unaccompanied immigrant children. A national provider of shelters for immigrant children will reopen one of two Arizona facilities it was forced to shutter last year because of issues with employee background checks. The Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019, it approved an application by Southwest Key to reopen a Phoenix facility that can house 420 children. The shelters are for kids who traveled to the U.S. alone or were separated from a relative. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
September 04, 2019 - 5:09 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A national provider of shelters for immigrant children has reopened one of two Arizona facilities it was forced to shutter last year because of issues with employee background checks. The Arizona Department of Health Services said Wednesday it approved an application by Southwest Key...
Read More
September 04, 2019 - 2:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Many mothers detained in border stations this summer reported the health of their children worsened while in custody, recounting bouts of fever, diarrhea and respiratory illness they say were not properly treated, according to a nonprofit legal group's questionnaire of 200...
Read More
September 04, 2019 - 2:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Many mothers who were detained in border stations this summer reported that the health of their children worsened in custody. That's according to a questionnaire of 200 women by a nonprofit legal group that provides services to mothers detained in immigration custody at a family...
Read More
FILE - In this Aug. 11, 2019, file photo an iPhone displays the apps for Facebook and Messenger in New Orleans. Facebook says the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will be violating the company's rules if agents create fake profiles to monitor the social media of foreigners seeking to enter the country. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File)
September 03, 2019 - 4:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook said Tuesday that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security would be violating the company's rules if agents create fake profiles to monitor the social media of foreigners seeking to enter the country. "Law enforcement authorities, like everyone else, are required to use...
Read More

Pages