Healthcare industry regulation

September 11, 2019 - 7:38 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A Dutch court has acquitted a doctor in a landmark trial that prosecutors and physicians hope will help clarify how the country's 2002 euthanasia law can be applied to people with severe dementia. The doctor was cleared of any wrongdoing in carrying out euthanasia...
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California Highway Patrol officers take into custody an opponent of recently passed legislation to tighten the rules on giving exemptions for vaccinations, after she cabled herself to the doors of the state Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. The state Assembly approved the companion bill, Monday, with changes demanded by Gov Gavin Newsom as a condition of signing the controversial vaccine bill SB276 which was passed by the Legislature last week.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
September 09, 2019 - 9:35 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed bills Monday to crack down on doctors who write fraudulent medical exemptions for school children's vaccinations. The Democratic governor quietly acted less than an hour after lawmakers sent him changes he demanded as a condition of...
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September 04, 2019 - 4:58 pm
DENVER (AP) — After watching his mother die slowly when he stopped her medication, Neil Mahoney knew he wanted the option of ending his own life peacefully when a doctor told him in July that he had months to live after being diagnosed with cancer. A physician was willing to help him do that under...
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FILE - This Aug. 4, 2015 file photo, flowers bloom in front of the Salt Lake Temple, at Temple Square, in Salt Lake City. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is reminding members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by a competent doctor. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
August 16, 2019 - 8:32 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has issued a warning to members that coffee is prohibited no matter how fancy the name, that vaping is banned despite the alluring flavors and that marijuana is outlawed unless prescribed by "competent" doctors. The new guidance...
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FILE - In this May 20, 2019, file photo, New York Giants wide receiver Golden Tate makes a catch during an NFL football practice in East Rutherford, N.J. Golden Tate has had the appeal of his four-game suspension for a violation of the NFL's policy on performance enhancers turned down. The decision by an independent arbiter was announced Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, and means the 10-year-veteran will miss the first four games of the regular season, starting with Dallas on Sept. 8. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger, File)
August 14, 2019 - 4:12 pm
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) — New York Giants wide receiver Golden Tate III never hesitated to take a prescribed fertility drug because the doctor who wrote the prescription told him he had given it to other NFL players and it was not banned. Speaking to reporters a day after an independent arbiter...
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FILE - In this Saturday, June 28, 2014 file photo a woman kisses a baby next to a man wearing a shirt reading "SOS Homophobia" during the annual Gay Pride march in Paris, France. Single women and lesbians in France won't have to go abroad to have babies anymore under a proposed new law that would give them access to medically assisted reproduction for the first time. (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)
August 04, 2019 - 5:13 pm
PARIS (AP) — Single women and lesbians in France no longer would have to go abroad to get pregnant with a doctor's help under a proposed law that would give them access to medically assisted reproduction at home for the first time. A bioethics law drafted by French President Emmanuel Macron's...
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In this Saturday, July 27, 2019 photo, retired nurse Tim Thomas, who assisted in a surgery in the parking lot of Watsonville Community Hospital after the facility lost power following the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake, poses during his visit to Lodi, Calif. California hospitals are asking lawmakers to scale back earthquake standards because they cost too much and might not be needed. Talk of scaling back the standards upsets Thomas, who was thrown to the floor during the earthquake. "To not make provisions to have the hospitals keep pace with the rest of the infrastructure doesn't make any sense to me" says Thomas. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
August 04, 2019 - 11:41 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California hospitals are asking lawmakers to scale back some earthquake standards because they cost too much and might not be needed. Most hospitals in the earthquake prone state have met a 2020 deadline for standards designed to keep hospital buildings from collapsing in...
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August 01, 2019 - 2:40 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — The first state lawmaker in the United States to be expelled for sexual misconduct since the #MeToo movement began is hospitalized and on life support. Don Shooter, a Republican from Yuma, Arizona, was thrown out of the Legislature in February 2018 after being found to have...
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FILE - In this Jan. 28, 2019, file photo, Bonnie Bowman, a supporter of a voter-approved measure to fully expand Medicaid, gathers with others during a rally at the Utah state Capitol, urging lawmakers not to change the law. President Donald Trump's administration has rejected Utah's planned request for enhanced federal funding for partial expansion of its Medicaid program, state officials said Saturday, July 27. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
July 29, 2019 - 6:17 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Trump administration's rejection of Utah's plan to partially expand Medicaid could send other states back to the drawing board on covering more low-income people under President Barack Obama's signature health care law. The decision is disappointing for leaders in...
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In this Wednesday, July 17, 2019, photo, Laurie Barber, a Little Rock, Ark., ophthalmologist, talks with patient Carolyn Lay at the Little Rock Eye Clinic. Barber chairs a group that wants to hold a referendum on a new Arkansas law that expands the procedures that optometrists can perform. Arkansas optometrists who say they have to refer patients sometimes as far as an hour away successfully urged the Legislature this year to expand what procedures they can perform. But that change sparked an expensive and heated lobbying fight, and now faces the prospect of going before voters next year. (AP Photo/Andrew DeMillo)
July 26, 2019 - 12:44 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — As an optometrist in the small Arkansas town of Osceola, Dr. Matthew Jones must tell patients several times a week to seek treatment elsewhere — sometimes as far as an hour away — for procedures he says he's fully capable of performing. "They look at me and ask, 'Why don't...
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