Genetics

Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 1:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is accompanied by Sacramento County Public Defender Diane Howard, right, during his arraignment in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. Authorities said they used a genetic genealogy website to connect some crime-scene DNA to DeAngelo. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2018 - 2:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study estimates that about 60 percent of the U.S. population with European heritage may be identifiable from their DNA by searching consumer websites, even if they've never made their own genetic information available. That number is expected to grow as more and more people...
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October 08, 2018 - 4:59 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've located the first well-documented genetic glitch that increases a man's risk of impotence, a step that might someday lead to new treatments. Most impotence isn't caused by genetics but rather things like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, drug and...
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This 2013 photo provided by the Boyce Thompson Institute shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. In an opinion paper published Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peace-time purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field. (Meena Haribal/Boyce Thompson Institute via AP)
October 04, 2018 - 4:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon. In an opinion paper published Thursday in the journal Science, the...
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FILE - This undated fluorescence-colored microscope image made available by the National Institutes of Health in September 2016 shows a culture of human breast cancer cells. On Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, scientists reported they've found a new way to determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results. (Ewa Krawczyk/National Cancer Institute via AP)
September 12, 2018 - 5:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've found a new way to help determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results. Researchers used genetic engineering to create thousands of tiny variations...
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This undated photo provided by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation in September 2018 shows John B. Glen in his home in Cheshire, England. On Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, the Lasker clinical medicine award went to Glen who discovered and developed the world’s most widely used drug for inducing anesthesia, propofol, nicknamed “milk of amnesia.” (Flora Lichtman/Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation via AP)
September 11, 2018 - 12:41 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Four scientists have won prestigious medical awards for genetics research and development of a widely used anesthetic nicknamed "milk of amnesia." Winners of the $250,000 awards from the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation were announced Tuesday. The prizes will be presented later...
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In this Monday, Aug. 13, 2018 photo, Brian Madeux interacts with research nurse Chrishauna Lacy at his home in New River, Ariz. Madeux was the first person in the world to participate in a gene editing attempt in his body, for the inherited disease Hunter syndrome. Early partial results from the study were released on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Matt York)
September 05, 2018 - 8:58 am
PHOENIX (AP) — Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it's too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed. The results announced Wednesday are from the first human...
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In this 2011 photo provided by Bence Viola of the University of Toronto, researchers excavate a cave for Denisovan fossils in the Altai Krai area of Russia. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, scientists reported in the journal Nature that they have found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. (Bence Viola/Department of Anthropology - University of Toronto/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 1:05 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 file photo, a nurse practitioner prepares to start the first human gene editing treatment for Hunter syndrome, an inherited metabolic disease, at a hospital in Oakland, Calif. On Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018, federal officials said that gene therapy is becoming an established form of medical care and carries no special risks that warrant special regulation, as they revised rules for vetting such experiments and products. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
August 15, 2018 - 6:57 pm
U.S. health officials are eliminating special regulations for gene therapy experiments, saying that what was once exotic science is quickly becoming an established form of medical care with no extraordinary risks. A special National Institutes of Health oversight panel will no longer review all...
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August 13, 2018 - 2:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Want to know your inherited risk of a heart attack? Today's genetic testing can't tell much — it mostly looks for rare mutations in one or a few genes, while common threats like heart disease or diabetes are caused by lots of genes working together. Now researchers have developed...
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