Food and drink

FILE- In this Jan. 9, 2019, file photo Michael Northern, vice president of WJP Restaurant Group, stands next to an empty table at dinnertime at Rocket City Tavern near numerous federal agencies in Huntsville, Ala. Businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. Northern said business is down 35 percent. “People are just going home and nesting, trying to conserve resources,” said Northern. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
January 24, 2019 - 6:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — From power restaurants in Washington and a belt-buckle maker in Colorado to a brewery in California, businesses that count heavily on federal employees as customers are feeling the punishing effects of the government shutdown. In many cases, it's forcing them to cut workers' hours...
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FILE - In this March 8, 2010, file photo, a woman walks by sculptures of whales, the symbol of the southwestern Japanese town of Taiji. Japanese whalers are discussing plans ahead of their July 1, 2019 resumption of commercial hunting along the northeastern coasts for the first time in three decades. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara, File)
January 24, 2019 - 4:58 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese whalers discussed plans Thursday to resume their commercial hunting along the northeastern coast on July 1, for the first time in three decades. Their preparation follows Japan's decision in December to leave the International Whaling Commission, abandoning decades-long...
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Fat Slice pizza employee Gustavo Munoz fills a cup with water Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019, in Berkeley, Calif. Berkeley has approved a 25-cent tax on disposable cups city officials say is part of an effort to eliminate restaurant waste. The City Council voted unanimously Wednesday to approve the ordinance that also forces restaurants to provide to-go containers that are compostable by January 2020. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
January 23, 2019 - 8:09 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Patrons of restaurants and coffee shops in Berkeley, California, who don't bring a reusable cup for their beverage will have to pay a 25-cent fee for a disposable cup as part of an ordinance approved by city officials to reduce restaurant waste. Berkeley's City Council voted...
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Sean Mossman, director of sales and marketing for COOP Ale Works, draws a beer in the COOP taproom in Oklahoma City, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. Rules that went into effect in Oklahoma in October allow grocery, convenience and retail liquor stores to sell chilled beer with an alcohol content of up to 8.99 percent. Previously, grocery and convenience stores could offer only 3.2 percent beer. Liquor stores, where stronger beers were available, were prohibited from selling it cold. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
January 19, 2019 - 11:23 am
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Beer snobs are raising their mugs to a stronger brew in three states that once forbade grocers from selling anything but low-alcohol brands, and the changes could indirectly chill the industry in two others where such regulations remain. Until October, Oklahoma grocery and...
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In this Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019 photo, U.S. Coast Guard Culinary Specialist Jerry Wright, right, and Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Laughlin, second from right, stack boxes of donated cereal at a pop-up food pantry created at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The pantry was created by local Coast Guard-related advocacy groups to help hundreds of civilian and non-civilian Coast Guard employees to help makes ends meet during the partial federal government shutdown. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)
January 18, 2019 - 4:54 pm
NEW LONDON, Conn. (AP) — If the uniformed cadets milling about the local movie theaters and pizza joints didn't make it obvious enough, a banner hanging from a downtown parking garage makes it crystal clear: New London is an official Coast Guard City. The pride is on display everywhere in this...
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In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, President Donald Trump talks to the media about the table full of fast food in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, for the reception for the Clemson Tigers. The partial government shutdown is hitting home for President Trump in a very personal way. He lives in government-run housing, after all. Just 21 of the roughly 80 people who help care for the White House _ from butlers to electricians to chefs _ are reporting to work. The rest have been furloughed. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
January 18, 2019 - 1:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The partial government shutdown is hitting home for President Donald Trump in a very personal way. He lives in government-run housing, after all. Just 21 of the roughly 80 people who help care for the White House — from butlers to electricians to chefs — are reporting to work. The...
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In this Jan. 14, 2019 photo, President Donald Trump talks to the media about the table full of fast food in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, for the reception for the Clemson Tigers. The partial government shutdown is hitting home for President Trump in a very personal way. He lives in government-run housing, after all. Just 21 of the roughly 80 people who help care for the White House _ from butlers to electricians to chefs _ are reporting to work. The rest have been furloughed. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
January 15, 2019 - 10:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Junk food for athletes? President Donald Trump's offer of greasy burgers and fries to the college football champion Clemson Tigers brought a roasting from late-night TV hosts. Trump, a fast-food lover, said he paid for the meal himself because of the partial government shutdown,...
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January 14, 2019 - 1:13 pm
WICHITA FALLS, Texas (AP) — Police in northern Texas say a woman has been banned from a local Walmart after she spent several hours driving an electric shopping cart around the store's parking lot while drinking wine from a Pringles can. Police tell the Times Record News that officers responded to...
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This Oct. 4, 2016 image released by NBC shows Lin-Manuel Miranda during an interview with host Jimmy Fallon on "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon," in New York. Fallon’s “Tonight Show” broadcast from Puerto Rico on Jan. 15, will showcase artists with ties to the U.S. territory. Besides previously announced Miranda, Fallon will be joined on the show by Jose Feliciano, Bad Bunny and Ozuna. (Andrew Lipovsky/NBCU Photo Bank via AP)
January 10, 2019 - 4:06 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jimmy Fallon's "Tonight Show" broadcast from Puerto Rico will showcase artists with ties to the U.S. territory. Besides previously announced guest Lin-Manuel Miranda, Fallon said Thursday he will be joined on the Tuesday, Jan. 15, show by Jose Feliciano, Bad Bunny and Ozuna. The...
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This Oct. 4, 2016 image released by NBC shows Lin-Manuel Miranda during an interview with host Jimmy Fallon on "The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon," in New York. Fallon’s “Tonight Show” broadcast from Puerto Rico on Jan. 15, will showcase artists with ties to the U.S. territory. Besides previously announced Miranda, Fallon will be joined on the show by Jose Feliciano, Bad Bunny and Ozuna. (Andrew Lipovsky/NBCU Photo Bank via AP)
January 10, 2019 - 4:02 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jimmy Fallon's "Tonight Show" broadcast from Puerto Rico will showcase artists with ties to the U.S. territory. Besides previously announced guest Lin-Manuel Miranda, Fallon said Thursday he will be joined on the Tuesday, Jan. 15, show by Jose Feliciano, Bad Bunny and Ozuna. The...
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