Civil rights violations

July 18, 2019 - 2:18 pm
A federal court has upheld a Florida law that limits who gets to give dietary advice. The ruling comes in a lawsuit filed by a health coach who was fined for practicing without a dietary license. Heather Del Castillo said Florida's law violated her First Amendment right to free speech, noting...
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Gwen Carr, mother of chokehold victim Eric Garner, left, speaks outside the U.S. Attorney's office, in the Brooklyn borough of New York, as Garner's widow Esaw Snipes listens at right, Tuesday, July 16, 2019. Federal prosecutors won't bring civil rights charges against New York City police officer Daniel Pantaleo, in the 2014 chokehold death of Garner, a decision made by Attorney General William Barr and announced one day before the five-year anniversary of his death, officials said. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
July 16, 2019 - 6:44 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — After years of silence, federal prosecutors said Tuesday that they won't bring criminal charges against a white New York City police officer in the 2014 chokehold death of Eric Garner, a black man whose dying words — "I can't breathe" — became a national rallying cry against police...
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FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump talks about drug prices during a visit to the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington. A federal judge Monday, July 8, 2019, blocked a major White House initiative on prescription drug costs, saying the Trump administration lacked the legal authority to require drugmakers to disclose their prices in TV ads. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
July 08, 2019 - 10:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge Monday blocked a major White House initiative on prescription drug costs, saying the Trump administration lacked the legal authority to require drugmakers to disclose their prices in TV ads. The narrow ruling by U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington, D.C.,...
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FILE – This combination of March 29, 2017, file photos shows Bridget Kelly, left, leaving federal court after sentencing and Bill Baroni leaving federal court after sentencing in Newark, N.J. The Supreme Court agreed Friday, June 28, 2019, to hear a case involving Kelly and Baroni, two former New Jersey officials convicted of felonies for causing gridlock near the George Washington Bridge to punish a mayor for not backing their boss, former Republican Gov. Chris Christie. (AP Photos/Julio Cortez, File)
June 28, 2019 - 11:05 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court agreed Friday to hear a case involving two former New Jersey officials convicted of felonies for causing gridlock near the George Washington Bridge to punish a mayor for not backing their boss, former Republican Gov. Chris Christie. The justices announced...
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This undated selfie provided by Andrea Gallagher shows her husband, U.S. Navy SEAL Edward Gallagher, who has been charged with allegedly killing an Islamic State prisoner in his care and attempted murder for the shootings of two Iraq civilians in 2017. Gallagher is scheduled to go on trial Monday, June 17, 2019. (Edward Gallagher/Courtesy of Andrea Gallagher via AP, File)
June 17, 2019 - 9:35 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Seasoned combat veterans who described losing comrades and taking war prisoners were questioned Monday as possible jurors in the trial of a decorated Navy SEAL charged with killing a wounded Islamic State captive in Iraq. All but one of the potential jurors in the court-martial of...
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Supporters attend a rally Tuesday, June 4, 2019 for a group of young people who filed a lawsuit saying U.S. energy policies are causing climate change and hurting their future. The group faces a major hurdle Tuesday as lawyers for the Trump administration argue to stop the case from moving forward. in Portland, Ore. (AP Photo/Steve Dipaola)
June 04, 2019 - 8:45 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — In a courtroom packed with environmental activists, federal judges wrestled Tuesday with whether climate change violates the constitutional rights of young people who have sued the U.S. government over the use of fossil fuels. A Justice Department attorney warned three judges...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2019, file photo, Milwaukee Bucks' Sterling Brown prepares to shoot a free throw during the second half of an NBA basketball game against the Oklahoma City Thunder in Milwaukee. The city of Milwaukee wants to offer Bucks guard Sterling Brown $400,000 to settle his lawsuit alleging that police used excessive force when they used a stun gun to arrest him over a parking violation. The Journal Sentinel reports that the city's Common Council has scheduled a June 10 vote on whether to extend the offer. City attorneys are asking officials to authorize it. (AP Photo/Aaron Gash, File)
May 31, 2019 - 4:53 pm
MILWAUKEE (AP) — The attorney for Milwaukee Bucks guard Sterling Brown says police officers have testified under oath in a lawsuit that they violated his civil rights when they used a stun gun to arrest him over a parking violation. The comments Friday from attorney Mark Thomsen came in response to...
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May 28, 2019 - 10:34 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court will not take up a challenge to a Pennsylvania school district's policy allowing transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms that correspond with their sexual identity. The justices on Tuesday rejected an appeal from students who argued that allowing...
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FILE- In this March 11, 2002 file photo, Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin watches during the sentencing portion of his trial in Atlanta. Al-Amin, the militant civil rights leader known in the 1960s as H. Rap Brown who was convicted of killing Fulton County Sheriff's Deputy Ricky Kinchen and wounding Deputy Aldranon English in a shootout in March 2000, is challenging his imprisonment, saying his constitutional rights were violated at trial. (AP Photo/Ric Feld, File)
May 03, 2019 - 12:03 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — The 1960s black militant formerly known as H. Rap Brown is challenging his imprisonment for the killing of a sheriff's deputy in 2000, saying his constitutional rights were violated at trial. The 75-year-old inmate, who converted to Islam and now goes by the name Jamil Abdullah Al-...
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Suffolk District Attorney Rachael Rollins speaks during a news conference announcing a plan to file a federal lawsuit against U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Monday, April 29, 2019, in Boston, over its policy of arresting people at courthouses on civil immigration matters. The announcement comes days after federal prosecutors charged a judge and former court officer in Newton, Mass., with obstruction of justice for allegedly helping a man wanted by federal immigration authorities escape a courthouse. (AP Photo/Alanna Durkin Richer)
April 29, 2019 - 5:04 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Prosecutors in Massachusetts sued Monday to block federal authorities from making arrests at courthouses of people suspected of being in the country illegally, arguing the practice is making it harder for them to hold defendants accountable and get justice for victims. The top...
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