Bosnian War

Relatives and friends of the victims, with religious leaders among the some thousands of mourners gathered at a soccer stadium in Kozarac near the town of Prijedor, behind the coffins draped with green cloth for the funeral of 86 Muslims, Saturday July 20, 2019. The victims were slain by Serbs in one of the worst atrocities of the country's 1992-95 war, aged 19 to 61, and were among some 200 Bosnian Muslims and Croats from Prijedor who were executed in Aug. 1992 on a cliff on Mt. Vlasic known as Koricanske Stijene. (AP Photo/Almir Alic)
July 20, 2019 - 1:10 pm
PRIJEDOR, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Several thousand people attended a funeral service in Bosnia on Saturday for 86 Muslims who were slain by Serbs in one of the worst atrocities of the country's 1992-95 war. Relatives of the victims, religious leaders and others gathered at a soccer stadium near...
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A horse carriage carries the coffin containing the body of Slavisa Krunic during his funeral procession in his home village of Glamocani, outside the northern Bosnian city of Banja Luka, Thursday, April 25, 2019. Thousands of people in Bosnia have attended the funeral of a prominent businessman and government critic who was gunned down this week in a mafia-style ambush. (AP Photo/Radivoje Pavicic)
April 25, 2019 - 10:56 am
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Sobbing with grief, thousands of Bosnians attended the funeral Thursday of a prominent Bosnia Serb businessman and government critic who was gunned down earlier this week in a mafia-style ambush. Slavisa Krunic, who owned several businesses including a private...
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FILE - A Monday, July 11, 2016 file photo of Bosnian people saying prayers in front of coffins during a funeral ceremony for the 127 victims at the Potocari memorial complex near Srebrenica, 150 kilometers (94 miles) northeast of Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. A Bosnian Serb leader has wrongly called the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, where over 8,000 Muslim men and boys were killed by Bosnian Serb troops, "a fabricated myth." Milorad Dodik, head of Bosnia's multi-ethnic joint presidency, spoke during a conference discussing war crimes. His comments defy international court rulings that said genocide was committed in the eastern Bosnian enclave and have angered Bosnian Muslims. (AP Photo/Amel Emric, File)
April 13, 2019 - 12:36 pm
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — A Bosnian Serb leader has wrongly called the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, where over 8,000 Muslim men and boys were killed by Bosnian Serb troops, "a fabricated myth." The comments defy international court rulings that say genocide was committed in the eastern...
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Bruce Dickinson poses for cameras with his honorary citizen certificate at the city hall in Sarajevo, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Saturday, April 6, 2019. Bosnia's capital Sarajevo has declared Iron Maiden lead singer Bruce Dickinson an honorary citizen in gratitude for the concert the heavy metal band held while the city was under siege during 1992-95 war. (AP Photo/Eldar Emric)
April 06, 2019 - 9:15 am
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Bosnia's capital city made Iron Maiden lead singer Bruce Dickinson an honorary citizen Saturday for a concert he performed while Sarajevo was under siege during the 1992-95 war. Mayor Abdulah Skaka presented the award at a ceremony in Sarajevo City Hall, which...
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Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic enters the court room of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals in The Hague, Netherlands, Wednesday, March 20, 2019. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals judges will on Wednesday rule whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic's 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes, as well as his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool)
March 20, 2019 - 10:28 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday upheld the convictions of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, and increased his sentence from 40 years to life imprisonment. Karadzic showed almost no reaction as...
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FILE - In this Aug. 25, 1992 file photo, Radovan Karadzic, Bosnian Serb leader in Bosnia-Herzegovina, indicates the Serb territories in Yugoslavia during a news conference in London. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia’s devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction during Europe’s bloodiest carnage since World War II. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday March 20, 2019, will decide whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic’s 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/Denis Paquin, File)
March 20, 2019 - 10:09 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The Latest on a U.N. court's decision on the conviction and sentencing of ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic (all times local): 3 p.m. United Nations appeals judges have upheld the convictions of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic for genocide, war crimes...
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FILE - In this Sept. 23, 1992 file photo, Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic holds a knife he said was seized from Bosnian Croat soldiers in Bosnia during a news conference in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia’s devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction during Europe’s bloodiest carnage since World War II. United Nations appeals judges on Wednesday March 20, 2019, will decide whether to uphold or overturn Karadzic’s 2016 convictions for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and his 40-year sentence. (AP Photo/File)
March 19, 2019 - 7:25 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Nearly a quarter of a century since Bosnia's devastating war ended, former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is set to hear the final judgment on whether he can be held criminally responsible for unleashing a wave of murder and destruction. United Nations appeals...
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Backdropped by the Byzantine-era Hagia Sophia, demonstrators chant slogans against the mosque attacks in New Zealand during a protest in Istanbul, Saturday, March 16, 2019. World leaders expressed condolences and condemnation following the deadly attacks on mosques in the New Zealand city of Christchurch, while Muslim leaders said the mass shooting was evidence of a rising tide of violent anti-Islam sentiment.(AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
March 16, 2019 - 8:32 pm
BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The white supremacist suspected in the mosque shootings that left at least 50 people dead in New Zealand had traveled to the Balkans in the past three years, where he toured historic sites and apparently studied battles between Christians and the Ottoman empire. Authorities...
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A police officer patrols at a cordon near a mosque in central Christchurch, New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019. Multiple people were killed in mass shootings at two mosques full of worshippers attending Friday prayers on what the prime minister called "one of New Zealand's darkest days," as authorities detained four people and defused explosive devices in what appeared to be a carefully planned attack. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
March 15, 2019 - 9:52 am
The self-proclaimed racist who attacked a New Zealand mosque during Friday prayers in an assault that killed 49 people used rifles covered in white-supremacist graffiti and listened to a song glorifying a Bosnian Serb war criminal. These details highlight the toxic beliefs behind an unprecedented,...
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Members of the police forces of the Republic of Srpska, an entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina, during a parade marking the 27th anniversary of the Republic of Srpska, in the Bosnian town of Banja Luka, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019, celebrating a controversial holiday despite strong opposition from other ethnic groups in Bosnia who view it as discriminatory. The Jan. 9 holiday marks the date in 1992 when Bosnian Serbs declared the creation of their own state in Bosnia, igniting the country's devastating four-year war that killed over 100,000 people and left millions homeless. (AP Photo/Amel Emric)
January 09, 2019 - 9:39 am
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — In a show of nationalist defiance, Bosnian Serbs celebrated a holiday on Wednesday that has been criticized as discriminatory by other ethnic groups in Bosnia. Waving Serb flags, several thousand people lined up in the main Serb city of Banja Luka to watch a...
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