Biology

FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2017, file photo, Nevada death row inmate Scott Raymond Dozier, right, confers with Lori Teicher, a federal public defender involved in his case, during an appearance in Clark County District Court in Las Vegas. Authorities say the 48-year-old Nevada death-row inmate who wanted for two years to die, but whose execution was postponed twice, has been found dead in his cell on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019, from an apparent hanging. (AP Photo/Ken Ritter, File)
January 06, 2019 - 3:17 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A twice-convicted murderer who had repeatedly said he wanted to die by lethal injection was found dead in his death-row prison cell from an apparent hanging, officials said Saturday. Scott Raymond Dozier, 48, was found unresponsive in his solo death-row cell at the state's maximum-...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2017, file photo, Nevada death row inmate Scott Raymond Dozier, right, confers with Lori Teicher, a federal public defender involved in his case, during an appearance in Clark County District Court in Las Vegas. Authorities say the 48-year-old Nevada death-row inmate who wanted for two years to die, but whose execution was postponed twice, has been found dead in his cell on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019, from an apparent hanging. (AP Photo/Ken Ritter, File)
January 05, 2019 - 11:59 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A twice-convicted murderer who declared he wanted to die and who Nevada officials said tried several times to kill himself after two scheduled lethal injections were postponed has been found dead from an apparent hanging, officials said Saturday. Scott Raymond Dozier, 48, was found...
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The empty entrance of the Smithsonian's National Zoo is seen, Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019, in Washington. Smithsonian's National Zoo is closed due to the partial government shutdown. President Donald Trump is convening a border security briefing Wednesday for Democratic and Republican congressional leaders as a partial government shutdown over his demand for border wall funding entered its 12th day. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
January 02, 2019 - 5:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Hungry pandas don't particularly care whether there's a partial government shutdown. The Washington National Zoological Park's most famous residents still need to be fed, as do thousands of other animals, even as the facility closed its gates Wednesday. The zoo is part of the...
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This combination of undated photos provided by Brett Ratcliffe in December 2018 shows, from left, Gymnetis drogoni, Gymnetis rhaegali and Gymnetis viserioni beetles from South America. Ratcliffe named three of his eight newest beetle discoveries after the dragons from the HBO series "Game of Thrones" and George R.R. Martin book series "A Song of Ice and Fire." (Brett Ratcliffe via AP)
December 30, 2018 - 1:10 pm
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A Nebraska entomologist has named three of his eight newest beetle discoveries after the dragons from the HBO series "Game of Thrones" and George R.R. Martin book series "A Song of Ice and Fire." University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor Brett Ratcliffe named the new scarab...
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In this Oct. 9, 2018 photo, an embryologist adjusts a microplate containing embryos that were injected with gene-editing components in a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Most Americans say it would be OK to change the DNA of babies before they're born to protect them from a variety of diseases _ but a December 2018 poll shows they'd draw the line at gene editing to create children who are smarter, faster or taller. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 29, 2018 - 12:24 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say it would be OK to use gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but a new poll finds they'd draw the line at changing DNA so children are born smarter, faster or taller. A month after startling claims of the births of the...
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FILE - In this Oct. 25, 2018, file photo, Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., speaks to media on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lawmakers clashed over science, ethics and politics Thursday, Dec. 13, at a House hearing on using fetal tissue in critically important medical research, as the Trump administration reviews the government’s ongoing support for such studies. “Most of my constituents don’t understand when you harvest baby parts, why that is OK,” said Meadows, who chaired the hearing by the Oversight & Government Reform committee. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
December 13, 2018 - 2:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers clashed over science, ethics and politics on Thursday at a House hearing on using fetal tissue in critically important medical research. The Trump administration is reviewing whether taxpayer dollars are being properly used to fund for such studies. Research fields in...
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Senior Hazel Ostrowski attends her first period AP statistics class at Franklin High School Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, in Seattle. High school students are getting more sleep in Seattle, according to a study on later school start times. Ostrowski was among a group at Franklin and another Seattle high school who wore activity monitors to discover whether a later start to the school day would help them get more sleep. It did, adding 34 minutes of slumber a night, and they reported less daytime sleepiness and grades improved. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
December 12, 2018 - 2:47 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — High school students are getting more sleep in Seattle, say scientists studying later school start times. Teenagers wore activity monitors to find out whether a later start to the school day would help them get more sleep. It did, adding 34 minutes of slumber a night. They also...
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In this undated photo provided by researchers in December 2018, a male tungara frog in Panama uses his vocal sac to call out in Gamboa, Panama. A study released on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, examines why these amphibians adapt their mating calls in urban areas _ an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on forests. (Adam Dunn via AP)
December 10, 2018 - 11:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — City frogs and rainforest frogs don't sing the same tune, researchers have found. A study released Monday examined why Panama's tiny tungara frogs adapt their mating calls in urban areas — an unexpected example of how animals change communication strategies when cities encroach on...
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The 2018 Nobel Chemistry laureate, Frances H. Arnold poses during the traditional Nobel Chair Signing ceremony at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm, Sweden, on Thursday Dec. 6, 2018. (Claudio Brescian/TT via AP)
December 07, 2018 - 5:39 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry say that excessive concerns about genetically modified foods and other substances can inhibit mankind from benefiting from developments in the field. Frances Arnold from the United States and Gregory Winter of Britain made the...
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December 04, 2018 - 7:49 am
MIAMI (AP) — A worldwide search is on to find blood donors with a rare genetic variation to help save a 2-year-old South Florida girl battling cancer. Zainab Mughal has neuroblastoma and needs life-saving transfusions. But finding compatible donors is immensely challenging, because she's missing a...
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