Biology

FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2018, file photo, a healthcare worker from the World Health Organization gives an Ebola vaccination to a front line aid worker in Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. One-fourth of the people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study released Wednesday, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are now facing. (AP Photo/Al-hadji Kudra Maliro, File)
March 28, 2019 - 5:24 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — One out of four people interviewed in eastern Congo last year believed Ebola wasn't real, according to a new study, underscoring the enormous challenges health care workers are facing in what has become the second-deadliest outbreak in history. The survey released late...
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In this Tuesday, March 12, 2019 photo, a loggerhead turtle swims in a tank at a marine animal rehabilitation center near Boston. Warmer waters in New England are proving attractive to sea turtles, but with a catch. Many are swimming north only to be trapped by cooling waters. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
March 28, 2019 - 1:14 am
QUINCY, Mass. (AP) — At a sea turtle hospital housed at an old New England shipyard, a biologist leans over a table and uses a needle to draw blood from a sick loggerhead before tagging its flailing flipper. These were the first tentative steps toward a return to the ocean for this juvenile...
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This Feb 23, 2019, photo shows the inside of a computer with the ASUS logo in Jersey City, N.J. Security researchers say hackers infected tens of thousands of computers from the Taiwanese vendor ASUS with malicious software for months last year through the company’s online automatic update service. Kaspersky Labs said Monday, March 25, that the exploit likely affected more than 1 million computers from the world’s No. 5 computer company, though it was designed to surgically install a backdoor in a much smaller number of PCs. (AP Photo/Jenny Kane)
March 25, 2019 - 9:54 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Security researchers say that hackers infected tens of thousands of computers from the Taiwanese vendor ASUS with malicious software last year through the company's online automatic update service. Kaspersky Lab, a Russian cybersecurity firm, said Monday that it detected 57,000...
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This March 2019 image shows part of the health advice option in a 23andme genetic test. But Isaac Kohane, a biomedical researcher at Harvard, said research in the field is still limited and that there’s little evidence any small effects from genetic variations can be translated into meaningful dietary advice. (AP Photo)
March 25, 2019 - 9:30 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Avoid fast food, eat vegetables and exercise. It sounds like generic health advice, but they're tips supposedly tailored to my DNA profile. The suggestions come from 23andme, one of the companies offering to point you toward the optimal eating and exercise habits for your genetics...
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This undated electron microscope image provided by William Miller of Baker University in March 2019 shows a tardigrade of the class Heterotardigrada, also known as a "water bear." The small animals, about the size of a period, are able to survive extreme heat, cold, radiation and even the vacuum of space. (William Miller via AP)
March 20, 2019 - 4:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth's ultimate survivors can weather extreme heat, cold, radiation and even the vacuum of space. Now the U.S. military hopes these tiny critters called tardigrades can teach us about true toughness. These animals are pipsqueaks, only about the size of a period. Under a...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2018 file photo, a researcher installs a fine glass pipette into a microscope in preparation for injecting embryos with Cas9 protein and PCSK9 sgRNA at a lab in Shenzhen in southern China's Guandong province. On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, an expert committee convened by the World Health Organization is calling for the U.N. health agency to create a global registry of scientists working on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)
March 19, 2019 - 2:52 pm
GENEVA (AP) — A panel convened by the World Health Organization said it would be "irresponsible" for scientists to use gene editing for reproductive purposes, but stopped short of calling for a ban. The experts also called for the U.N. health agency to create a database of scientists working on...
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FILE - In this Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016 file photo, Shiite Muslim men beat themselves with knives attached to chains during a procession to mark Ashoura in Kabul, Afghanistan. In a report released on Wednesday, March 13, 2019, researchers say self-flagellation should be added to the list of ways to spread a dangerous viral blood infection. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)
March 13, 2019 - 12:40 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Add self-flagellation to the list of ways to get a dangerous viral blood infection. Researchers said Wednesday that they were initially puzzled how 10 British men had become infected with a little-known virus, because the men hadn't taken risks usually associated with the disease...
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March 12, 2019 - 2:08 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Somewhere in the Midwest, a restaurant is frying foods with oil made from gene-edited soybeans. That's according to the company making the oil, which says it's the first commercial use of a gene-edited food in the U.S. Calyxt said it can't reveal its first customer for competitive...
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This Sept. 12, 2015, photo provided by Jacqueline Sones shows a Janolus Nudibranch in Bodega Harbor, Calif. A new study reports that dozens of warm-weather species of sea slugs, jellyfish and other marine life migrated into the northern California region over an unusually long two-year period of severe heatwaves. The University of California, Davis report is to be published Tuesday, March 12, 2019, in Scientific Reports. (Jacqueline Sones via AP)
March 12, 2019 - 6:05 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A new study reports that dozens of warm-weather species of sea slugs, jellyfish and other marine life migrated into the Northern California region over an unusually long two-year period of severe heatwaves. The University of California, Davis report studying heatwaves in 2014-...
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This 2009 photo provided by AquaBountyTechnologies shows a juvenile salmon raised at the company's hatchery in Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had lifted an alert had that had prevented AquaBounty from importing its salmon eggs to its Indiana facility, where they would be grown before being sold as food. (AquaBountyTechnologies via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 10:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert that had...
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