Biology

Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 1:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2014 file photo, a laptop computer monitors a patient's heart function as he takes a stress test in Augusta, Ga. The American Heart Association conference ending Monday, Nov. 12, 2018 in Chicago revealed a lot about what works and what does not for preventing heart attacks. (Michael Holahan/The Augusta Chronicle via AP)
November 11, 2018 - 1:05 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Fish oil, vitamin D, novel drugs, new cholesterol guidelines: News from an American Heart Association conference over the weekend reveals a lot about what works and what does not for preventing heart attacks and other problems. Dietary supplements missed the mark, but a prescription-...
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In this Sept. 28, 2015 file photo, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology director Ruth Gates talks about her project to create "super coral" near her lab on Coconut Island in Kaneohe, Hawaii. Gates, who dedicated much of her career to saving the world's fragile and deteriorating coral reefs, has died at age 56. The University of Hawaii, where Gates was the director of the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, said Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018, that the researcher died in Honolulu on Thursday, Oct. 25, 2018. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
October 30, 2018 - 7:52 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Pioneering coral reef scientist Ruth Gates, who dedicated much of her career to saving the world's fragile and deteriorating underwater reef ecosystems, has died. She was 56. The University of Hawaii said Tuesday that Gates died in Honolulu on Thursday. The researcher, also the...
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In this Sept. 13, 2018, photo, paleontologist Xu Xing brushes away sediment to examine fossils recovered from a dig site in Yanji, China. The excavation, led by Xu, begun after construction crews erecting new apartment buildings accidentally uncovered dinosaur bones and other fossils, dating back 100 million years. (AP Photo/Christina Larson)
October 25, 2018 - 1:58 am
YANJI, China (AP) — At the end of a street of newly built high-rises in the northern Chinese city of Yanji stands an exposed cliff face, where paleontologists scrape away 100 million-year-old rock in search of prehistoric bones. Like many fossil excavation sites in China, this one was discovered by...
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FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2008, file photo, Nobel Prize in Chemistry laureate Osamu Shimomura speaks during the press conference at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden. Shimomura, one of three scientists who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for the discovery and development of a jellyfish protein that contributed to cancer studies, has died in Japan’s southern city of Nagasaki where he studied as a student. He was 90. His alma mater Nagasaki University said Monday, Oct. 22, 2018, that Shimomura died Friday of natural causes.(AP Photo/Scanpix, Fredrik Persson, File)
October 22, 2018 - 1:53 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese-born Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has died. He was 90. His alma mater Nagasaki University said Monday that Shimomura died Friday of natural causes. Shimomura and two American scientists shared the 2008 Nobel prize for the discovery...
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This undated photo provided by Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues shows a snake named in honor of environmental biologist Bob Thomas. Thomas us the environmental biologist and head of the Center for Environmental Communication at Loyola University New Orleans. He says he has a picture of the snake on his wall, and it makes him smile every time he looks at it. (Courtesy of Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues via AP)
October 20, 2018 - 10:28 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A Louisiana professor is in heady company, honored by having one of three newly identified species of snakes from the Galapagos Islands named after him. "They named one after Charles Darwin — that's a no-brainer — and one after the Greek god of fire, and one after me, of all...
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In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, supporters of dam removals and other measures intended to help endangered orca whales stand near a giant inflatable orca outside a building in Tacoma, Wash., where the Southern Resident Killer Whale Recovery Task Force was meeting for a two-day work session. Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of the critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
October 18, 2018 - 6:06 pm
TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention. Some argue the quickest way to get more salmon to the starving whales is to tear down four dams...
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This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 2:39 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is accompanied by Sacramento County Public Defender Diane Howard, right, during his arraignment in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. Authorities said they used a genetic genealogy website to connect some crime-scene DNA to DeAngelo. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2018 - 2:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study estimates that about 60 percent of the U.S. population with European heritage may be identifiable from their DNA by searching consumer websites, even if they've never made their own genetic information available. That number is expected to grow as more and more people...
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October 08, 2018 - 4:59 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've located the first well-documented genetic glitch that increases a man's risk of impotence, a step that might someday lead to new treatments. Most impotence isn't caused by genetics but rather things like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, drug and...
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