Biology

James Allison, one of the 2018 Nobel Prize winners for medicine, speaks during a press conference, Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, in New York. Allison and Tasuku Honjo won the Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discoveries that help the body marshal its cellular troops to attack invading cancers. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
October 01, 2018 - 5:14 pm
Two researchers from the U.S. and Japan won the Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discoveries that have revolutionized cancer care, turning the body's immune system loose to fight tumors in an approach credited with saving an untold number of lives. James Allison of the University of Texas M.D...
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FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2015 file photo Dr. James P. Allison, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, poses for a photo in New York. James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo are jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology Monday, Oct. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, file)
October 01, 2018 - 10:38 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the 2018 Nobel Prizes (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Nobel winner James Allison of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center says more basic research is needed to help cancer patients. Allison won the 2018 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday along with Tasuku...
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In this Aug. 2018 photo provided by Tom Bradley, a bear eats from a garbage can outside the Bradley family home, in Canton, Conn. Connecticut reports that human encounters with bears are on the rise. A wildlife biologist with the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection says there have been about two dozen reports this year of bears breaking into Connecticut homes and businesses, about four times the yearly average. (Tom Bradley via AP)
September 24, 2018 - 10:35 pm
CANTON, Conn. (AP) — Tom Bradley had grown accustomed to seeing black bears walk through his Connecticut neighborhood, but this month he was alarmed to find something trying to turn a doorknob to enter his house. He used his key fob to set off his car horn, to scare away whatever was in his garage...
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This undated photo provided by Ilya Bobrovskiy in September 2018 shows a Dickinsonia fossil from the White Sea area of Russia. The body is about 9 centimeters (3.5 inches) long. In a report released on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018, scientists say they've confirmed that these fossils from more than 500 million years ago are traces of an animal, which makes that creature one of the earliest known. (Ilya Bobrovskiy/Australian National University via AP)
September 20, 2018 - 2:15 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've confirmed that puzzling fossils from more than 500 million years ago are traces of an animal. That would make it one of the earliest known creatures. The fossils are impressions in rock: oval shapes with internal lines, looking somewhat like a leaf imprint...
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FILE - In this May 26, 2010 file photo, a Coccinellidae, more commonly known as a ladybug or ladybird beetle, rests on the petals of a rose in Portland, Ore. A study estimates a 14 percent decline in ladybugs in the United States and Canada from 1987 to 2006. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
September 20, 2018 - 1:06 am
OXFORD, Pa. (AP) — A staple of summer — swarms of bugs — seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried. Pesky mosquitoes, disease-carrying ticks, crop-munching aphids and cockroaches are doing just fine. But the more beneficial flying insects of summer — native bees, moths,...
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September 14, 2018 - 12:41 pm
SAO PAULO (AP) — Members of the International Whaling Commission defeated a Japanese proposal to reinstate commercial whaling at a meeting in Brazil on Friday. The commission suspended commercial whaling in the 1980s, but Japan argued that stocks have recovered sufficiently for the ban to be lifted...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2018, file photo, Southern Resident killer whale J50 and her mother, J16, swim off the west coast of Vancouver Island near Port Renfrew, B.C. Teams searched Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018, for the sick, critically endangered orca in the waters of Washington state and Canada, but a scientist who closely tracks the population in the Pacific Northwest said he believes the whale, known as J50, has died. (Brian Gisborne/Fisheries and Oceans Canada via AP, file)
September 13, 2018 - 6:10 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Teams searched Thursday for a sick, critically endangered orca in the waters of Washington state and Canada, but a scientist who closely tracks the population in the Pacific Northwest said he believes the whale known as J50 has died. Experts have been preparing last-ditch efforts to...
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FILE - This undated fluorescence-colored microscope image made available by the National Institutes of Health in September 2016 shows a culture of human breast cancer cells. On Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, scientists reported they've found a new way to determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results. (Ewa Krawczyk/National Cancer Institute via AP)
September 12, 2018 - 5:29 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've found a new way to help determine whether specific genetic abnormalities are likely to make people sick, a step toward avoiding a vexing uncertainty that can surround DNA test results. Researchers used genetic engineering to create thousands of tiny variations...
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This undated photo provided by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation in September 2018 shows John B. Glen in his home in Cheshire, England. On Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, the Lasker clinical medicine award went to Glen who discovered and developed the world’s most widely used drug for inducing anesthesia, propofol, nicknamed “milk of amnesia.” (Flora Lichtman/Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation via AP)
September 11, 2018 - 12:41 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Four scientists have won prestigious medical awards for genetics research and development of a widely used anesthetic nicknamed "milk of amnesia." Winners of the $250,000 awards from the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation were announced Tuesday. The prizes will be presented later...
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September 06, 2018 - 5:13 pm
IRVINE, Calif. (AP) — Ruining the reputation of sharks as bloodthirsty predators, California researchers said they have found a shark that enjoys a side of seagrass with its prey. Bonnethead sharks not only eat grass while chomping fish and squid — they also digest the plant and gain nutrition from...
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