Biology

This undated photo provided by Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues shows a snake named in honor of environmental biologist Bob Thomas. Thomas us the environmental biologist and head of the Center for Environmental Communication at Loyola University New Orleans. He says he has a picture of the snake on his wall, and it makes him smile every time he looks at it. (Courtesy of Miguel Trefaut Rodrigues via AP)
October 20, 2018 - 10:28 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A Louisiana professor is in heady company, honored by having one of three newly identified species of snakes from the Galapagos Islands named after him. "They named one after Charles Darwin — that's a no-brainer — and one after the Greek god of fire, and one after me, of all...
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In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, supporters of dam removals and other measures intended to help endangered orca whales stand near a giant inflatable orca outside a building in Tacoma, Wash., where the Southern Resident Killer Whale Recovery Task Force was meeting for a two-day work session. Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of the critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
October 18, 2018 - 6:06 pm
TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention. Some argue the quickest way to get more salmon to the starving whales is to tear down four dams...
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This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 2:39 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is accompanied by Sacramento County Public Defender Diane Howard, right, during his arraignment in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. Authorities said they used a genetic genealogy website to connect some crime-scene DNA to DeAngelo. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2018 - 2:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study estimates that about 60 percent of the U.S. population with European heritage may be identifiable from their DNA by searching consumer websites, even if they've never made their own genetic information available. That number is expected to grow as more and more people...
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October 08, 2018 - 4:59 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists say they've located the first well-documented genetic glitch that increases a man's risk of impotence, a step that might someday lead to new treatments. Most impotence isn't caused by genetics but rather things like obesity, diabetes, heart disease, smoking, drug and...
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FILE--In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. A new scientific effort will map the genomes of critically endangered Pacific Northwest orcas to better understand their genetics and potentially find ways to save them from extinction. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
October 04, 2018 - 7:40 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A new scientific effort will sequence the genomes of critically endangered Pacific Northwest orcas to better understand their genetics and potentially find ways to save them from extinction. The collaboration announced Thursday involves scientists with the National Oceanic and...
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This 2013 photo provided by the Boyce Thompson Institute shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. In an opinion paper published Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peace-time purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field. (Meena Haribal/Boyce Thompson Institute via AP)
October 04, 2018 - 4:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon. In an opinion paper published Thursday in the journal Science, the...
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In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018 photo, a Colorado River razorback sucker fish is shown swimming in a tank at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office in Lakewood, Colo. Officials say that the rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern United States. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott)
October 04, 2018 - 3:01 pm
DENVER (AP) — Another rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, wildlife officials said Thursday, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern U.S. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended reclassifying the ancient and odd-looking...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 24, 2016 file photo, US biochemical engineer Frances Arnold, speaks after winning the Millennium Technology Prize 2016 during the awards ceremony in Helsinki, Finland. Frances Arnold, US, George P Smith US and Gregory P Winter of Britain have been awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. (Heikki Saukkomaa/Lehtikuva via AP)
October 03, 2018 - 6:47 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the awarding of the Nobel Prizes (all times local): 12:45 a.m. Nobel chemistry winner Frances Arnold is celebrating her prize with her students and fellow faculty members at the California Institute of Technology. Arnold learned of her prize while traveling in Texas...
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In this 1988 image provided by Nokia Bell Labs shows Arthur Ashkin at the lab in Holmdel, N.J. American Arthur Ashkin, Canadian Donna Strickland, and French scientist Gerard Mourou won the 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics announced Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, for work in laser physics. Ashkin, entered the record books of the Nobel Prizes by becoming the oldest laureate at age 96. (Nokia Bell Labs via AP)
October 02, 2018 - 3:50 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists from the United States, Canada and France won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for revolutionizing the use of lasers in research, finding ways to make them deliver more powerful flashes of light and even to act like tiny tweezers. Their work paved the way for laser eye...
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