Aerospace and defense industry

FILE - This Dec. 7, 2015, file photo shows the second Boeing 737 MAX airplane being built on the assembly line in Renton, Wash. A new computer problem has been found in the troubled Boeing 737 Max that will further delay the plane's return to flying after two deadly crashes, according to two people familiar with the matter. The latest flaw in the plane's computer system was discovered by Federal Aviation Administration pilots who were testing an update to critical software in a flight simulator in the fourth week of June 2019 at a Boeing facility near Seattle, the people said. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because the development has not been made public. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
June 26, 2019 - 8:28 pm
A new software problem has been found in the troubled Boeing 737 Max that could push the plane's nose down automatically, and fixing the flaw is almost certain to further delay the plane's return to flying after two deadly crashes. Boeing said Wednesday that the FAA "identified an additional...
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NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg speaks during a media conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Tuesday, June 25, 2019.NATO defense ministers begin a two-day meeting on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
June 26, 2019 - 9:56 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg on Wednesday refused to rule out that the military alliance might adapt its nascent missile defense shield to counter the potential threat posed by a new Russian missile system. In February, the U.S. began the six-month process of withdrawing...
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A SpaceX Falcon heavy rocket lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., early Tuesday, June 25, 2019. The Falcon rocket has a payload military and scientific research satellites. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
June 25, 2019 - 11:48 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX launched its heftiest rocket with 24 research satellites Tuesday, a middle-of-the-night rideshare featuring a deep space atomic clock, solar sail, a clean and green rocket fuel testbed, and even human ashes. It was the third flight of a Falcon Heavy rocket, but...
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NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg speaks during a media conference at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Tuesday, June 25, 2019.NATO defense ministers begin a two-day meeting on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)
June 25, 2019 - 9:28 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — NATO defense ministers are set to endorse a list of measures that could be used against Russia should it refuse to comply with a major Cold War-era missile treaty, the military alliance's secretary general, Jens Stoltenberg, said Tuesday. In February, the United States began the 6-...
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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2008, file photo, passengers walk through the departure hall at the Changi International Airport in Singapore. Drones buzzing around Singapore's Changi Airport have caused the delay or diversion of 63 flights in the past week, triggering an official investigation and raising questions about the motives of the offenders. Regulators said Tuesday, June 25, 2019, that 18 flights at the airport were delayed and seven were diverted the night before "due to bad weather and unauthorized drone activities."(AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
June 25, 2019 - 9:26 am
SINGAPORE (AP) — Drones buzzing around Singapore's Changi Airport have caused 63 flights to be delayed or diverted in the past week, triggering an investigation and raising questions about the motives of the offenders. The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore said Tuesday that 18 flights at the...
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Russian space agency rescue team help Russian cosmonaut Оleg Kononenko, center, to get from the capsule shortly after the landing of the Russian Soyuz MS-11 space capsule about 150 km (80 miles) south east of the Kazakh town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, June 25, 2019. Three astronauts safely returned to Earth on Tuesday after spending more than six months aboard the International Space Station. (Alexander Nemenov/Pool Photo via AP)
June 25, 2019 - 12:38 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Three astronauts safely returned to Earth on Tuesday after spending more than six months aboard the International Space Station. The Soyuz capsule with astronauts from Canada, Russia and the United States landed in the steppes of Kazakhstan at 8:47 a.m. (0247GMT), less than a minute...
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Geena Davis speaks at the AT&T's SHAPE: "The Scully Effect is Real" panel with Geena Davis and Mayim Bialik on Saturday, June 22, 2019 in Burbank, Calif. (Photo by Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP)
June 23, 2019 - 12:53 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis says achieving gender parity on screen is simple, and it could happen overnight. "Just go through (the script) and cross out a bunch of male first names and put female first names. That's all you have to do," Davis told the audience during...
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June 22, 2019 - 11:46 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis says achieving gender parity in media could happen overnight if screenwriters simply opted for female characters instead of male ones. Davis joined fellow actor Mayim Bialik at AT&T's SHAPE Conference on Saturday to discuss the need for...
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FILE - In this image provided by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. A new poll shows most Americans prefer focusing on potential asteroid impacts over a return to the moon. The survey by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was released Thursday, June 20, one month before the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong and Aldrin’s momentous lunar landing. (Neil A. Armstrong/NASA via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 8:47 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public...
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Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger speaks during a House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure hearing on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, June 19, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 19, 2019 - 4:58 pm
Airline union leaders and a famed former pilot said Wednesday that Boeing made mistakes while developing the 737 Max, and the biggest was not telling anybody about new flight-control software so pilots could train for it. Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger, who landed a crippled airliner safely on the...
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