Addiction and substance abuse

U.S. Attorney David Anderson announces a new federal crime-fighting initiative in San Francisco on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019. Seventeen federal law enforcement agencies will team up for a yearlong crackdown on a notorious area of San Francisco where open drug use has been tolerated for years. (AP Photo/Samantha Maldonado)
August 07, 2019 - 8:31 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The first step in a sweeping crackdown on crime ranging from drugs to sex trafficking in a notorious San Francisco neighborhood yielded 32 arrests of mostly Honduran nationals tied to two international operations that poured heroin and cocaine into the community, U.S...
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Protesters, including Carol Lorento, center, gather outside a courthouse on Friday, Aug. 2, 2019, in Boston, where a judge was to hear arguments in Massachusetts' lawsuit against Purdue Pharma over its role in the national drug epidemic. Organizers said they wanted to continue to put pressure on the Connecticut pharmaceutical company and the Sackler family that owns it. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
August 02, 2019 - 1:45 pm
BOSTON (AP) — They came bearing oversized images of the sons and daughters they lost to drug overdoses and signs demanding justice from the pharmaceutical company they hold most responsible. The parents and their supporters rallied outside a Boston courthouse Friday as a judge heard arguments in...
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This photo taken Monday, May 13, 2019, shows Karen Guttensen and Ingvar Ingolfsson, right, both 14-years old, outside the Tjornin youth center in Reykjavik, Iceland, on a bright summer night. The island nation in the North Atlantic has dried up a teenage culture of drinking and smoking by focusing on local participation in music and sports options for students, with such success that Icelandic teens now have one of the lowest rates of substance abuse in Europe. (AP Photo/Egill Bjarnason)
July 31, 2019 - 9:45 am
REYKJAVIK, Iceland (AP) — The clock strikes 10 p.m. on a Friday night when the "Parent Patrol" enters a popular playground in suburban Reykjavik. The teens turn down the music and reach for their phones to check the time: It's ticking into curfew. Every weekend, parents all over the Icelandic...
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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2008, a small child walks toward the front door of the Public Health Service Indian Hospital on the Standing Rock Reservation in Fort Yates. N.D. A federal audit released Monday, July 22, 2019, finds that government hospitals placed Native Americans at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses. The audit says a handful of Indian Health Service hospitals, including the Fort Yates Hospital, failed to follow the agency’s protocols for dispensing and prescribing the drug. The Indian Health Service agreed with the more than a dozen recommendations and says changes are in the works. (AP Photo/Will Kincaid, File)
July 22, 2019 - 7:59 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — U.S. government hospitals put Native American patients at increased risk for opioid abuse and overdoses, failing to follow their own protocols for prescribing and dispensing the drugs, according to a federal audit made public Monday. The report by the U.S. Department of...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 12:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic? An expert in pain treatment at the University of Kentucky, Brown led a panel of outside...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018 file photo, Christine Gagnon, of Southington, Conn., holds a sign during a protest with others who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses, outside the Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. Nearly ten years ago, the blockbuster painkiller OxyContin was reformulated to discourage abuse by snorting and injecting, but it's unclear whether the harder-to-abuse format has decreased cases of addiction, overdose and death. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 22, 2019 - 10:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a decade ago, the maker of OxyContin responded to a growing wave of opioid abuse by making the painkiller harder to snort and inject. But has that reformulation translated into fewer drug overdoses and deaths? It's a question that experts like Dr. Raeford Brown of the...
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July 11, 2019 - 11:58 am
LONDON (AP) — Consumer products company Reckitt Benckiser says it will pay $1.4 billion to resolve U.S. investigations into the marketing of an anti-addiction drug by a subsidiary. The company said Thursday it reached agreements with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission...
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Dr. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, works in the MRI lab at the National Institutes of Health’s research hospital in Bethesda, Md., on Thursday May 16, 2019. Volkow is studying how anti-addiction medicines work inside the brains of people undergoing treatment for opioid abuse. In the background are NIH neuroimaging specialists Dana Feldman and Danielle Kroll. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
July 09, 2019 - 11:49 am
BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Lying inside a scanner, the patient watched as pictures appeared one by one: A bicycle. A cupcake. Heroin. Outside, researchers tracked her brain's reactions to the surprise sight of the drug she'd fought to kick. Government scientists are starting to peek into the brains of...
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This June 26, 2019, photo shows customs officials display seized drugs at the customs office in Sepang. Malaysia's government has announced plans to remove criminal penalties for the possession and use of drugs in small quantity to battle addiction, but stressed the move is not akin to legalizing drugs. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
June 28, 2019 - 1:03 am
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's government plans to drop criminal penalties for the possession and use of drugs in small quantities to battle addiction, but stressed the move is not akin to legalizing narcotics. Malaysia has one of the world's harshest penalties for drug possession. Anyone...
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June 12, 2019 - 8:53 am
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — The nation's opioid addiction crisis has prompted every state except one to pursue legal action against drugmakers, distributors or pharmaceutical companies. The attorney general in Nebraska has been active in combatting opioid addiction, but so far has remained on the...
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