Science

FILE - In this file photo dated Thursday, July 25, 2019, a bird sits on a straw bale on a field in Frankfurt, Germany, as the sun rises during an ongoing heatwave in Europe. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday Aug. 15, 2019, that July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, FILE)
August 15, 2019 - 12:13 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Meteorologists say July was the hottest month measured on Earth since records began in 1880. The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday that July was 0.95 degrees Celsius (1.71 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than the 20th century average for the month. The...
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This undated photo provided by the 'Helmholtz centre for polar and marine research the Alfred Wegener institute' shows snow samples from Tschuggen, Switzerland, locked and ready for transport to Davos. Scientists of the institute say they proved plastic in the snow of the Alps and the Arctic. (Juerg Trachsel/WSL-Institut für Schnee- und Lawinenforschung SLF via AP)
August 14, 2019 - 2:44 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found an abundance of tiny plastic particles in Arctic snow, indicating that so-called microplastics are being sucked into the atmosphere and carried long distances to some of the remotest corners of the planet. The researchers examined snow collected from sites...
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In this photo provided from the Department of Antiquities of Cyprus, on Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019, Archeologists work at the archeological site area during the 2019 excavation season at Kouklia outside in southwest city of Paphos, Cyprus. Archaeologists say the discovery of a small clay shard inscribed with a partial inventory of goods at a 2,500 year-old citadel suggests that Cyprus' ancient city states "more than likely" had a homegrown, common economic management system. (Department of Antiquities of Cyprus via AP)
August 14, 2019 - 12:46 pm
NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — The discovery of a small clay shard inscribed with a partial inventory of goods at a 2,500-year-old citadel suggests that Cyprus' ancient city states "more than likely" managed their economies using a homegrown system, not an imported one, an archaeologist said Wednesday...
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Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 12:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
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Dr. Paul Scofield, senior curator natural history at Canterbury Museum, holds the fossil, a tibiotarsus, top, next to a similar bone of an Emperor Penguin in Christchurch, New Zealand, Wednesday, Aug. 14, 2019. Scientists in New Zealand say they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of a human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
August 14, 2019 - 7:52 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Scientists in New Zealand said Wednesday they've found fossilized bones from an extinct monster penguin that was about the size of an adult human and swam the oceans some 60 million years ago. They said the previously undiscovered species is believed to have stood...
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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 1997 file photo, then John McGrail, director of the Department of Energy stockpile stewardship program, talks about the $100 million Device Assembly Facility behind him at the Nevada Test Site in Mercury, Nev. Nevada's U.S. senators and Energy Secretary Rick Perry are set to tour the site north of Las Vegas where the federal government is handling weapons-grade plutonium shipped from South Carolina. A federal appeals court has ruled against Nevada in a legal battle over the U.S. government's secret shipment of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, denied the state's appeal after a judge refused to block any future shipments to Nevada. The court in San Francisco says the matter is moot because the Energy Department already sent the radioactive material and has promised that no more will be hauled there. (AP Photo/Lennox McLendon, File)
August 13, 2019 - 9:59 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday ruled against Nevada in a battle with the U.S. government over its secret shipment of weapons-grade plutonium to a site near Las Vegas but the state's attorney general says the fight isn't over yet. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit...
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August 12, 2019 - 4:14 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — In a story Aug. 9 about a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announcement regarding the chemical glyphosate, The Associated Press misspelled the first name of a spokeswoman from Bayer AG. She is Charla Lord, not Chandra Lord. Also, in an early version of the story, the...
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FILE - In this July 14, 2019, file photo, a telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest mountain is viewed. Astronomers across 11 observatories on Hawaii’s tallest mountain have cancelled more than 2,000 hours of telescope viewing over the past four weeks because a protest blocked a road to the summit. Astronomers said Friday, Aug. 9, 2019, they will attempt to resume observations but in some cases won’t be able to make up the missed research. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
August 10, 2019 - 8:18 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Asteroids, including those that might slam into Earth. Clouds of gas and dust on the verge of forming stars. Planets orbiting stars other than our own. This is some of the research astronomers say they have missed out on at 11 observatories on Hawaii's tallest mountain as a protest...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 1:42 pm
GENEVA (AP) — Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making food more expensive, scarcer and less nutritious. "...
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Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, ahead of official talks with Estonian Prime Minister Juri Ratas, inside 10 Downing Street, London, Tuesday Aug. 6, 2019. (Dominic Lipinski/Pool via AP)
August 08, 2019 - 1:02 pm
LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he plans to introduce a new fast-track visa to attract more of the world's best scientists to the U.K. Johnson said Thursday he wanted to "ensure our immigration system attracts the very best minds from around the world." Few details were...
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